Porn Scam Warning – Don’t Get Caught Out By This Rogue Email From Hackers

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A PORN scam that tricks you into handing over thousands of pounds to hackers is doing the rounds online.

Cybersecurity experts have issued a fresh warning about rogue emails that try to “sextort” you out of your hard-earned cash.

Getty – Contributor A twisted new scam pretends to have filmed you watching porn – and tries to steal money from you

As the public gets savvier about dodgy cyber-attacks, hackers up their game – and make their digital tricks more elaborate.

The latest scam email you need to be wary of involves fake threats of blackmail, according to security firm Sophos.

Hackers will claim to have cracked your computer, and recorded your screen (plus webcam footage) of you watching porn online.

They’ll then demand a payment using the virtual Bitcoin currency, sometimes totalling thousands of pounds.

Getty – Contributor Hackers try to shame you with a fabricated porn habit – but it’s all fakery

“I created a double-screen video. First part shows the video you were watching (you’ve got a good taste haha…) and second part shows the recording of your web cam,” one example of a scam email reads.

“Exactly what should you do?

“Well, in my opinion, [AMOUNT] is a fair price for our little secret.

“You’ll make the payment by Bitcoin (if you do not know this, search ‘how to buy Bitcoin’ in Google.”

It sounds like an easy scam to spot, but the emails can seem alarmingly real.

That’s because the hackers include your phone number in the email address.

Sophos security expert Paul Ducklin explains that it’s likely hackers bought a cracked list of emails and phone numbers, and are using it to trick you – by making their email seem more legitimate.

“The crooks seem to have got hold of a list that ties email addresses and phone numbers together, so they’re putting your phone number (or at least what they think is your phone number) into the email,” Ducklin reveals.

But the scam is a complete hoax.

After all, if they had footage of you watching porn, they would’ve shared it as proof in the email.

Nevertheless, Ducklin believes victims may have actually paid up to avoid getting “exposed”.

It’s possible to track payments made to Bitcoin addresses, and Ducklin did just that.

It emerged that a total of 20 payments had been made to the hacker’s Bitcoin address, three of which totalled at least $1,000 (or £785).

Of course, these payments didn’t necessarily come from victims – but they may well have.




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