Life on Mars: NASA's Curiosity rover digs up clay samples – Is it PROOF of water on Mars?

Life on Mars: NASA's Curiosity rover digs up clay samples – Is it PROOF of water on Mars?

NASA’s lonely Mars rover has successfully retrieved its first batch of soil from a “clay-bearing unit” near Mars’ Mount Sharp region. The US space

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NASA’s lonely Mars rover has successfully retrieved its first batch of soil from a “clay-bearing unit” near Mars’ Mount Sharp region. The US space agency has targeted this part of Mars for a drilling mission even before Curiosity blasted off towards the planet in November 2011. NASA has now confirmed Curiosity retrieved samples of bedrock material from a rock dubbed Aberlady on Sunday, April 6. The rover then delivered the soil samples to its onboard laboratory equipment on April 10 and scientists are waiting for the analysis results with bated breath.

Water is one of the most fundamental building blocks of life by human standards and is key to discovering alien life in other parts of the cosmos.

Scientists have long suspected Mars once hosted a lush and wet atmosphere with a landscape not too different from that of Earth’s.

Today, however, the planet is a harsh and inhospitable desert with a paper-thin atmosphere blasted by intense solar radiation.

The only signs of water present on Mars have been found in the form of ice caps around the freezing south pole.

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Life on Mars: NASA Curiosity rover drilling clay

Life on Mars: Curiosity is drilling out samples of clay from Martian bedrock (Image: NASA)

But the presence of clay in Martian soil promises to update NASA’s understanding of Mars’s ancient past.

And the results of the rover’s drilling operation so far appear to be promising.

Jim Erickson of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said: “Curiosity has been on the road for nearly seven years.

“Finally drilling at the clay-bearing unit is a major milestone in our journey up Mount Sharp.”

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According to NASA, the remote rover’s drill “chewed easily” through the Martian rock, suggesting the bedrock was much softer than expected.

The space agency said in a statement: “It was so soft, in fact, that the drill didn’t need to use its percussive technique, which is helpful for snagging samples from harder rock.

“This was the mission’s first sample obtained using only rotation of the drill bit.”

However, it is unlikely the drilling mission will provide any major breakthrough in the hunt for liquid water.

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Life on Mars: NASA Curiosity rover on Mars

Life on Mars: Clay samples could be proof of ancient water could boost hopes of finding ancient life (Image: NASA)

Instead, NASA expects to learn more about how ancient waters helped shaped the three-mile-tall (five kilometres) Mount Sharp.

Finally drilling at the clay-bearing unit is a major milestone

Jim Erickson, NASA

NASA said Curiosity has so far encountered clay minerals and mudstones at every step of its journey through Mars.

These rocks are believed to have formed in ancient lakebeds by settling river sediments some 3.5 billion years ago.

The space agency said: “As with water elsewhere on Mars, the lakes eventually dried up.”

And Ashwin Vasavada, a JPL Curiosity scientist said: “Each layer of this mountain is a puzzle piece. They each hold clues to a different era in Martian history.

“We’re excited to see what this first sample tells us about the ancient environment, especially about water.”

But what does all of this mean for the potential to find life on Mars?

Scientists widely agree life here on Earth started in water and it is water, which made life on Earth possible.

Life on Mars: Martian clay bedrock

Life on Mars: The remote rover drilled into this soft bed of exposed Martian rock (Image: NASA)

And if scientists can prove the same conditions once existed on Mars, the probability simple, single-celled life evolved on Mars will skyrocket.

NASA said: “Whether the water is boiling hot or frozen, some sort of creature seems to thrive in it. Is it the same on other planets?

“If water once flowed on Mars, did life once thrive there too? Or, maybe there is still water on Mars, only it has gone underground.

“Could there be tiny life forms—like bacteria—on Mars even now?”



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