How monster ‘Godzilla’ wolffish of Fukushima five times bigger than normal emerged after nuclear disaster

How monster ‘Godzilla’ wolffish of Fukushima five times bigger than normal emerged after nuclear disaster

MONSTER fish with jaws big enough to swallow a child have been found lurking in the waters up the coast from the Fukushima nuclear disaster site. F

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MONSTER fish with jaws big enough to swallow a child have been found lurking in the waters up the coast from the Fukushima nuclear disaster site.

Fishermen tell tales of massive ‘mutant’ beasts which have been spotted since the toxic tragedy which rocked Japan eight years ago.

Twitter / Hiroshi Hirasaka

This terrifying giant wolffish is more than twice the normal size[/caption]

One prehistoric-looking Wolffish was even caught by a professional “fish hunter” after he went looking for one of the giants.

Hirasaka Hiroshi reeled in the monstrous creature during a trip to Hokkaido, Japan’s second largest island, near eastern Russia.

Normally the deep-sea species grow up to three feet in length, but the horror Hiroshi landed was more than six feet long and weighed five times more than usual.

His Twitter profile states: ‘I live to chase interesting creatures,’ and reveals he has written a book called ‘Exotic Fish Species: I Caught, Judged and Tried Eating.’

“It was worth flying to Hokkaido twice within three months. This guy is super cool” the fisherman posted on Twitter.

Because of the sheer size of the catch many locals believe the sea beast could be a result of fallout from the disaster but scientists say it could just be very old.

IT’S LIKE GODZILLA

And they say their theories are backed up by the fact giant catfish were discovered near the site of the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl in the Ukraine.

At that disaster site, the fish had grown to a record size even though divers who entered the toxic waters after the disaster suffered lethal radiation sickness and had to be buried in lead coffins.

The earthquake and tsunami that hammered Fukushima on March 11, 2011 triggered meltdowns in three of its six reactors.

However, more than seven years on, scientists say radioactive water is continuing to flow into the Pacific Ocean from the crippled No. 1 plant.

Terrifying Wolffish are normally found on the ocean floors of the Atlantic and Pacific and rarely emerge from the depths.

However, in 2017 we told how one was caught in Siberia after it reportedly tried to BITE people who got too close to its lake.

The fearsome creature – with a strong thick tail, rows of sharp teeth and powerful jaws – had terrified locals living near Lake Krugoe in Siberia.

ATTACKED LOCALS

Some feared it was a “mutant” born after radioactive waste was dumped in the lake by a nearby chemical factory.

And it is said to have tried to bite a number of people who had hoped for a close look at the freaky fish, according to reports in the Tomsk Oblast region.

As for the deep sea shocker caught near Japan – dubbed Godzilla by some – experts believe it is probably a extremely rare older specimen rather than an actual mutation.

“Very, very few mutations lead to extra-large size,” said University of South Carolina radiation specialist Dr Timothy Mousseau.

“(Instead), they grow less efficiently, they’re less capable of catching food and they tend to not live as long.

“If you look hard and long enough there’s always a few that manage to survive long enough to achieve these large sizes.”


Last week, it was reported Japan was at the centre of bizarre tsunami fears after a number of deep-sea fish believed to be harbingers of seismic doom washed up on the country’s coast.

Giant Oarfish are known as the ‘Messengers from the Sea God’s Palace’ and are said by some to appear on beaches ahead of submarine earthquakes.

Locals  say the massive serpent-like fish rise to the surface and beach themselves to escape being caught up in an underwater quake.

Twitter / Hiroshi Hirasaka

Fish hunter Hirasaka Hiroshi reeled in the monster off the coast of Hokkaido[/caption]

Reuters

Radioactive water continues to flow into the Pacific from the crippled plant[/caption]

Twitter / Hiroshi Hirasaka

A normal-sized wolffish is tiny in comparison to the monster landed by Hiroshi[/caption]

Reuters

an earthquake and tsunami hammered Fukushima on March 11, 2011[/caption]

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