How many driving licences are revoked each year on medical grounds?

How many driving licences are revoked each year on medical grounds?

The number of motorists over the age of 70 having licences revoked for medical reasons has soared, according to new statistics.Almost 22,500 elderl

Prince Philip car crash – was he hurt in the accident, what happened and who was driving?
Drink driving limit – How much will put you over the limit and how much can you be fined
Katie Price arrives at court to face trial over drink driving charge


The number of motorists over the age of 70 having licences revoked for medical reasons has soared, according to new statistics.

Almost 22,500 elderly drivers had their licences taken away last year – which is 142 per cent higher than the number rescinded on medical grounds in 2010.

That’s according to figures obtained from the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency following a Freedom of Information request by the Times.

It comes after Prince Philip’s crash near the Queen’s private home at Sandringham in Norfolk earlier in the year.

Revoked: The DVLA took the driving licences away from almost 22,500 motorists over the age of 70 last year because they were deemed unfit to be behind the wheel of a car

Revoked: The DVLA took the driving licences away from almost 22,500 motorists over the age of 70 last year because they were deemed unfit to be behind the wheel of a car

Revoked: The DVLA took the driving licences away from almost 22,500 motorists over the age of 70 last year because they were deemed unfit to be behind the wheel of a car

The DVLA is coming down harder on motorists with driving-impairing issues and illnesses – and not just elderly licence holders, the data shows.

The figures show that 61,482 car and motorbike licences were withdrawn in total during 2018, which is 117 per cent higher than 2010.

Elderly drivers experience the biggest loss of licences, though. 

The DVLA revoked just 9,265 from motorists over 70 years of age in 2010. Last year, it took licences away from 22,453 drivers in this age bracket.

The statistics were requested following growing concern for the number of elderly individuals still driving today.

The subject was thrown into the limelight earlier this year when Prince Philip was involved in a collision in his Land Rover Freelander in January, causing injury to two occupants in a Kia driving near the Queen’s residence in Norfolk.

Number of licences revoked on medical grounds in 2018 compared to 2010

17-19 years old: 1,294 licences revoked – 93% increase

20-29 years old: 5,198 licences revoked – 102% increase

30-39 years old: 6,621 licences revoked – 76% increase

40-49 years old: 8,057 licences revoked – 74% increase

50-59 years old: 9,416 licences revoked – 151% increase

60-69 years old: 8,323 licences revoked – 128% increase

70-79 years old: 12,360 licences revoked – 127% increase

80+ years old: 10,093 licences revoked – 163% increase

Source: DVLA figures provided to the Times

Motoring groups and road safety charities have been calling for stricter measures for older drivers to stay on the road following Prince Philips crash earlier this year

Motoring groups and road safety charities have been calling for stricter measures for older drivers to stay on the road following Prince Philips crash earlier this year

Motoring groups and road safety charities have been calling for stricter measures for older drivers to stay on the road following Prince Philips crash earlier this year

Prince Philip, 97, decided to stop driving less than a month after he was involved in a collision that left two women injured

Prince Philip, 97, decided to stop driving less than a month after he was involved in a collision that left two women injured

Prince Philip, 97, decided to stop driving less than a month after he was involved in a collision that left two women injured

DVLA records show that 5.3 million individuals over 70 currently hold a driving licence – which represents around two thirds of the elderly populations.

In the mid-1990s, just 39 per cent in this age range were still on the road.

Under current rules, driving licences expire when motorists reach 70.

From then on they have to be renewed every three years. 

Drivers are responsible for declaring that their eyesight meets legal standards and flag up other relevant medical conditions that might result in them not being safe at the wheel. 

However, there are no compulsory assessments required for these motorists to retain their licences. 

Safety groups have called for tighter restrictions on these elderly drivers.

A spokesperson for road safety charity Brake told the Times that regulation around drivers’ fitness to drive should be ‘more rigorously enforced’.

This could include compulsory eyesight tests and checks of medical records before the DVLA releases licences back to older motorists.

AA president Edmund King echoed calls for tougher measures, calling for evidence of regular eye tests for elderly drivers and stricter guidance from GPs.

However, Caroline Abrahams, the charity director for Age UK, said elderly drivers are less likely to be involved in accidents than younger motorists and the threat of taking their licences away could hamper their quality of life.

The number of driving licences revoked from motorists over the age of 70 rose 152% between 2010 and last year. Licences taken away from drivers of all ages on medical grounds were up 117% over the same period

The number of driving licences revoked from motorists over the age of 70 rose 152% between 2010 and last year. Licences taken away from drivers of all ages on medical grounds were up 117% over the same period

The number of driving licences revoked from motorists over the age of 70 rose 152% between 2010 and last year. Licences taken away from drivers of all ages on medical grounds were up 117% over the same period

‘For many older people, driving is crucial to maintaining independence so it’s important that they should not be prevented from getting behind the wheel by their age alone,’ Abrahams told the Times. 

Drivers legally need to notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency if they’ve suffered from strokes, epilepsy or visual impairment before being deemed fit to take control of a car on British roads.

However, there are some conditions in particular that many people don’t know they need to tell the DVLA about before hitting the road – including deja vu and eating disorders.

You can see the full list of medical conditions you need to notify the DVLA about having if it has an impact on your capacity to drive a vehicle, 

The Department for Transport said the issue of older drivers would be addressed in a ‘refreshed road safety statement’ that was due to be published later this year.

MEDICAL CONDITIONS THE DVLA LISTS THAT COULD AFFECT YOUR DRIVING

Absence seizures

Acoustic neuroma

Addison’s disease

Agoraphobia

AIDS

Alcohol problems

Alzheimer’s disease

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Amputations

Angina

Angioma

Angioplasty

Ankylosing spondylitis

Anorexia nervosa

Anxiety

Aortic aneurysm

Arachnoid cyst

Arnold-Chiari malformation

Arrhythmia

Atrial defibrillator

Arteriovenous malformation

Arthritis

Asperger syndrome

Ataxia

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Autistic spectrum disorders (ASD)

Balloon angioplasty (leg)

Bipolar disorder

Blackouts

Blepharospasm

Blood clots

Blood pressure

Brachial plexus injury

Brain abscess, cyst or encephalitis

Brain aneurysm

Brain angioma

Brain haemorrhage

Brain injury (traumatic)

Brain tumours

Branch retinal vein occlusion

Broken limbs and driving

Burr hole surgery

Caesarean section

Cancer

Cataracts

Catheter ablation

Cardiac problems

Carotid artery stenosis

Cataplexy

Cerebral palsy

Chronic aortic dissection

Cognitive problems

Congenital heart disease

Convulsions

Coronary artery bypass or disease

Coronary angioplasty

Cystic fibrosis

Deafness

Defibrillator

Déjà vu

Dementia

Depression

Diabetes

Diabetic retinopathy

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Diplopia (double vision)

Dizziness

Drug misuse

Eating disorders

Empyema (brain)

Epilepsy

Essential tremor

Fainting

Fits

Fractured skull

Friedreich’s ataxia

Giddiness (recurring)

Glaucoma

Global amnesia

Grand mal seizures

Guillain-Barré syndrome

Head injury

Heart attack

Heart arrhythmia

Heart failure

Heart murmurs

Heart palpitations

Heart valve disease or replacement valve

Hemianopia

High blood pressure

HIV

Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Huntington’s disease

Hydrocephalus

Hypertension

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoxic brain damage

Hysterectomy

Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)

Intracerebral haemorrhage

Ischaemic heart disease

Kidney dialysis

Kidney problems

Korsakoff’s syndrome

Labyrinthitis

Learning difficulties

Left bundle branch block

Leukaemia

Lewy body dementia

Limb disability

Low blood sugar

Lumboperitoneal shunt

Lung cancer

Lymphoma

Macular degeneration

Malignant brain tumours

Malignant melanoma

Manic depressive psychosis

Marfan syndrome

Medulloblastoma

Memory problems (severe)

Meningioma

Mini-stroke

Monocular vision

Motor neurone disease

Multiple sclerosis

Myasthenia gravis

Myocardial infarction

Myoclonus

Narcolepsy

Night blindness

Nystagmus

Obsessive compulsive disorder

Obstructive sleep apnoea

Optic atrophy

Optic neuritis

Pacemakers

Palpitations

Paranoia

Paranoid schizophrenia

Paraplegia

Parkinson’s disease

Peripheral arterial disease

Peripheral neuropathy

Personality disorder

Petit mal seizures

Pituitary tumour

Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Psychosis

Psychotic depression

Renal dialysis

Retinal treatment

Retinopathy

Schizo-affective disorder

Schizophrenia

Scotoma

Seizures

Sight in one eye only

Sleep apnoea

Sleepiness (excessive daytime)

Spinal problems and injuries and driving

Stroke

Subarachnoid haemorrhage

Surgery

Syncope

Tachycardia

Temporal lobe epilepsy

Tonic clonic fits

Tourette’s syndrome

Transient global amnesia

Transient ischaemic attack (TIA)

Tunnel vision

Usher syndrome

Valve disease or replacement valve

Ventricular defibrillator

Vertigo

Vision in one eye only

Visual acuity (reduced)

Visual field defects

VP shunts

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

 Source: Gov.uk

SAVE MONEY ON MOTORING

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: