Chinese residents flock to dig ‘ancient coins’ in the debris after typhoon Mangkhut destroyed houses

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Residents of a Chinese town battered by typhoon Mangkhut have reportedly gone on a treasure hunt in the debris of collapsed houses as soon as the storm left.

A video released by Chinese media shows a group of residents in Guangdong Province in southern China digging through mud and bricks, hoping to find something that could make them an instant millionaire.

According to Beijing Youth Daily, the video was taken yesterday afternoon – just hours after the deadly tropical cyclone smashed through the province and left four people dead.

Video from Beijing Youth Daily shows residents in southern China hunting for treasure in the debris yesterday

Video from Beijing Youth Daily shows residents in southern China hunting for treasure in the debris yesterday

Typhoon Mangkhut had left their county in Guangdong Province

Typhoon Mangkhut had left their county in Guangdong Province

Video from Beijing Youth Daily shows residents hunting for treasure in the debris yesterday – as soon as typhoon Mangkhut left their county in Guangdong Province, southern China

The keen scavenger hunters were said to be looking for valuable silver coins

The keen scavenger hunters were said to be looking for valuable silver coins

It is said that one person had spotted the coins in the bricks of a collapsed house, soon causing a crowd to form

It is said that one person had spotted the coins in the bricks of a collapsed house, soon causing a crowd to form

The keen scavenger hunters were said to be looking for valuable silver coins. It is said that one person had spotted them in the bricks of a collapsed house, soon causing a crowd to form 

The report claimed that residents were looking for ancient coins and they were from the Haifeng county in Shanwei city.

The crowd allegedly started to gather after one person claimed to have spotted under the debris of one house some silver coins from the Republic of China era, which were distributed about 100 years ago.

Some people were said to come with metal detectors and the scavenger hunt lasted from the afternoon to the night.

In response to the footage, a spokesperson from the Haifeng Culture, Broadcasting and News Publishing Bureau told Beijing Youth Daily the residents had managed to find ‘dozens of silver coins’ and had returned them to the owner.  

Aerial view of a flooded road is seen in Yangchun, China's Guangdong Province, yesterday after typhoon Mangkhut, dubbed 'King of the Storms', made landfall in the province on Sunday

Aerial view of a flooded road is seen in Yangchun, China's Guangdong Province, yesterday after typhoon Mangkhut, dubbed 'King of the Storms', made landfall in the province on Sunday

Aerial view of a flooded road is seen in Yangchun, China’s Guangdong Province, yesterday after typhoon Mangkhut, dubbed ‘King of the Storms’, made landfall in the province on Sunday

Four people were killed in Guangdong during the storm - three by trees and one by debris

Four people were killed in Guangdong during the storm - three by trees and one by debris

Four people were killed in Guangdong during the storm – three by trees and one by debris

Firefighters pull an inflated boat to evacuate trapped people  in Yangchun yesterday

Firefighters pull an inflated boat to evacuate trapped people  in Yangchun yesterday

Firefighters pull an inflated boat to evacuate trapped people in Yangchun yesterday

A couple walks in a flooded road in Yangchun yesterday after the strong storm made landfall

A couple walks in a flooded road in Yangchun yesterday after the strong storm made landfall

A couple walks in a flooded road in Yangchun yesterday after the strong storm made landfall

A couple is seen at a temporary shelter in Yangchun. Three million people were evacuated

A couple is seen at a temporary shelter in Yangchun. Three million people were evacuated

A couple is seen at a temporary shelter in Yangchun. Three million people were evacuated

Super typhoon Mangkhut is expected to hit the Philippines before moving to strike Hong Kong

Super typhoon Mangkhut is expected to hit the Philippines before moving to strike Hong Kong

Super typhoon Mangkhut is expected to hit the Philippines before moving to strike Hong Kong

Typhoon is the name given to tropical cyclones generated in the western Pacific. 

Dubbed the ‘King of Storms’, Mangkhut is the most powerful typhoon of the year, having caused havoc in the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China’s Guangdong Province in the past few days. 

It made landfall in Guangdong Saturday evening.

Hundreds of Philippine rescuers today used shovels and their bare hands to sift through a massive landslide, with dozens feared dead in the region worst-hit by Mangkhut. Death toll has climbed to 74 in the nation.

Rescuers carry a body bag from the Philippines landslide site where dozens are feared buried

Rescuers carry a body bag from the Philippines landslide site where dozens are feared buried

Rescuers carry a body bag from the Philippines landslide site where dozens are feared buried

Searchers used shovels and bare hands to claw through mounds of rocky soil in the mountain town of Itogon, where 11 bodies have been pulled from the rubble and dozens more may still be trapped after a landslide buried an emergency shelter

Searchers used shovels and bare hands to claw through mounds of rocky soil in the mountain town of Itogon, where 11 bodies have been pulled from the rubble and dozens more may still be trapped after a landslide buried an emergency shelter

Searchers used shovels and bare hands to claw through mounds of rocky soil in the mountain town of Itogon, where 11 bodies have been pulled from the rubble and dozens more may still be trapped after a landslide buried an emergency shelter

The storm, with gusts of more than 230kph (142 mph), sent buildings swaying in Hong Kong and smashed windows in tower blocks and skyscrapers as people cowered inside

The storm, with gusts of more than 230kph (142 mph), sent buildings swaying in Hong Kong and smashed windows in tower blocks and skyscrapers as people cowered inside

The storm, with gusts of more than 230kph (142 mph), sent buildings swaying in Hong Kong and smashed windows in tower blocks and skyscrapers as people cowered inside

A boy rides his bike on a ruined cycling path destroyed by typhoon Mangkhut in Tseung Kwan O district in Hong Kong. The city was still struggling to get back on its feet on Tuesday

A boy rides his bike on a ruined cycling path destroyed by typhoon Mangkhut in Tseung Kwan O district in Hong Kong. The city was still struggling to get back on its feet on Tuesday

A boy rides his bike on a ruined cycling path destroyed by typhoon Mangkhut in Tseung Kwan O district in Hong Kong. The city was still struggling to get back on its feet on Tuesday

The typhoon smashed homes and flooded key agricultural regions in the northern Philippines before battering Hong Kong and southern China with fierce gusts of more than 230 kilometres per hour (142 mph).

Hong Kong was still struggling to get back on its feet today with a massive clean-up operation to clear broken trees, repair torn-up roads and fix damaged power lines.

Three million people were evacuated and four people were killed in Guangdong during the extreme weather, reported China Daily. Three people were said to be hit by trees and the other by building debris. 

The Guangdong authority reported a direct economic loss of more than 4.2 billion yuan (£470 million) in the region caused by Mangkhut, according to People’s Daily Online. 

Mangkhut was downgraded to a tropical storm yesterday morning.




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