Jaguar Xf Review: Jag’s £30,000 Motorway Cruiser Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary – And We Take The Latest Model For A Spin

Jaguar Xf Review: Jag’s £30,000 Motorway Cruiser Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary – And We Take The Latest Model For A Spin

A LOT has changed in the last decade – Instagram didn’t exist, the iPhone was just a year old and Gordon Brown was at Number 10. The car world is no d

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A LOT has changed in the last decade – Instagram didn’t exist, the iPhone was just a year old and Gordon Brown was at Number 10.

The car world is no different – electric cars were a novelty, driverless cars a pipedream and sales were on the rocks.

XF is celebrating its 10th birthday – but has it stood the test of time?

Since then diesel has become the devil, sales have recovered and manufacturers have been reborn – few quite as well as Jaguar.

The homegrown car maker has soared to new heights and ditched its old man image with cool, new models backed up by record-breaking sales.

But one model has stood the test of time, Jag’s big motorway cruiser: the XF.

The very first generation of which was delivered in March 2008 making this year something of a landmark for the luxury saloon.

XF is a comfortable cruiser for long distance trips

With Jaguar releasing the F-Pace, F-Type, E-Pace and XE in the last few years – can the XF still keep pace with the rest of the family?

Fortunately, the Brit maker hasn’t left the XF to grow old and retire just yet – instead it gave it a facelift in 2015 and has now plugged in its state-of-the-art 2.0-litre “Ingenium” petrol engine.

It’s also packed with the latest goodies from Jaguar’s tech whizzes – as standard that means wifi hotspot, Bluetooth, heated seats, keyless entry and parking sensors.

Plus you get the disappearing rotary dial and air vents that rotate out of sight when you power down the car. Necessary? No. Cool? Very.

Interior brings the ageing XF up to date with cool tech

Air vents and rotary dial disappear into dash when you switch the engine off

And if you’re willing to pay a bit more you can really get yourself ready for the future. Our test car was fully loaded and came in at £44,000.

That includes the dual view touchscreen that lets passengers watch TV while all the driver can see on the 10.2-inch screen is the sat nav or radio.

Pretty neat especially if you’re on a long journey and don’t want to miss something – although it’ll set you back over £1,500.

There’s also a gesture boot lid for £665, a beefed up Meridian sound system (£1,250) and £1,270 head-up display.

The XF is big – and it feels it at low speed

When the XF launched originally, Jaguar might have had a reputation as a bit old-fashioned. That’s long gone with the XF cutting a dash among the more bland BMWs and Audis.

One thing that hasn’t changed in the last decade is the XF’s size. If anything, it’s got bigger – and it feels it.

Measuring in at 4.9-metres long and weighing 1,600kg with the 2.0-litre, you do feel like it’s all a bit of a struggle.

The bonnet goes on for days and hauling it around tight streets looking for a parking space is not relaxing.

Facts and figures

Jaguar XF

Tested: Portfolio 2.0-litre turbo, petrol, AWD

Power: 246bhp

0-60mph: 6.2 seconds

Top speed: 147mph

Economy: 40.9mpg

CO2: 159g/km

Price: From £44,035

However, once you’re up and running on the open road, it steams along with effortless comfort. It’ll simply eat up the motorway miles.

And that’s what the XF will be used for by owners – as a long distance cruiser with a generous boot for gear and comfy back seats.

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